Open position: Postdoctoral fellow in Neuroscience

UPDATE 2016-04-11: The position has been filled. 

As part of a University-wide initiative on mechanisms of neuronal and synaptic injury in aging and neurodegenerative diseases, we are seeking talented and enthusiastic individuals to join our laboratory.

Carlos Ibanez is Professor at the Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National Univeristy of Singapore, and Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Under the direction of Prof. Carlos Ibanez, this project will focus on studies of the role of neurotrophin signaling in neurodegenerative diseases, with afocus on Alzheimer’s disease and dementias. This is an exciting opportunity for individuals who have received a doctoral degree within the past five years and with a strong background in cellular neurobiology. Other requirements include i) experience on mouse models, i i) experience in neurohistological methods, and iii) ability to work independently with precision and good organizational skills. Located on the Medical School campus of the National University of Singapore, there is close integration among the core laboratories of this strategic initiative. This provides for an exciting environment to pursue neuroscience research and a great opportunity in one of the most developed and exciting countries in the region.

Applications including CV and names plus email addresses of three referees should be sent by email  to Prof. Carlos Ibanez .

Deadline: MARCH 31, 2016

New review article published: Biology of GDNF and its receptors — Relevance for disorders of the central nervous system

A targeted effort to identify novel neurotrophic factors for midbrain dopaminergic neurons resulted in the isolation of GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) from the supernatant of a rat glial cell line in 1993. Over two decades and 1200 papers later, the GDNF ligand family and their different receptor systems are now recognized as one of the major neurotrophic networks in the nervous system, important for the devel- opment, maintenance and function of a variety of neurons and glial cells. The many ways in which the four mem- bers of the GDNF ligand family can signal and function allow these factors to take part in the control of multiple types of processes, from neuronal survival to axon guidance and synapse formation in the developing nervous system, to synaptic function and regenerative responses in the adult. In this review, recently published in Neurobiology Of Disease, basic aspects of GDNF signaling mechanisms and receptor systems are first summarized followed by a review of current knowledge on the physiology of GDNF activities in the central nervous system, with an eye to its relevance for neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. Read the full paper HERE.

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